All About TIMY – 07 – Ang Pagdadala Ni Ali Nicolas

Nenz and Euge discuss how Iris turning into an unlikable character and Ali fumbling in his first attempts in dating.

 

Intro/Outro by Lee Rosevere

All About TIMY – 07 – Ang Pagdadala Ni Ali Nicolas

All About TIMY – 05 – Payoffs and Dugdug Moments

Nenz, Rein and Euge discuss the idea of the “the dugdug moment” and the current payoffs of the story.

Intro/Outro music by Lee Rosevere

 

All About TIMY – 05 – Payoffs and Dugdug Moments

All About TIMY – 04 – Best Character (So Far) and Timeslot Change

Nenz and Euge discuss the weird scenes in TIMY’s 3rd week, the best character on the show right now (spoiler alert: it’s Val) and their reactions to the show’s timeslot switch.

Intro/Outro by Lee Rosevere

All About TIMY – 04 – Best Character (So Far) and Timeslot Change

All About TIMY – 03 – Pace and Ratings

Nenz and Euge discuss the highlights of week 2, the pros and cons of TIMY’s storytelling pace and Till I Met You’s ratings so far.

Intro/Outro music by Lee Rosevere

All About TIMY – 03 – Pace and Ratings

All About TIMY – 02 – First Week Impressions

Rein and Euge discuss their impressions of the smart and fast-paced first week of Till I Met You. They also discuss the metarelevance of James Dean and the similar themes of TIMY with OTWOL.

Music by Lee Rosevere

All About TIMY – 02 – First Week Impressions

ALL ABOUT TIMY – 01 – Trailer and First Episode Reactions

Welcome to the first episode of the TILL I MET YOU PODCAST by POP PHILTRE!

Nenz, Rein and Euge discuss the trailers, the first episode, JC Santos and the other cast members of TIMY

Intro/Outro Music by Lee Rosevere

 

ALL ABOUT TIMY – 01 – Trailer and First Episode Reactions

Thoughts On…This Time

IMPLICATIONS OF NETFLIX PH
Source: Viva Ent (youtube)

Coming from a successful teleserye and world tour, James Reid and Nadine Lustre are back with their fourth feature film. This Time’s about two childhood friends, Ava and Coby who only see each other every summer. Eventually, as years went on, their relationship blossomed- but not without obstacles and roadblocks.

Maybe I’ve been spoiled by the writing and direction of OTWOL so much because This Time felt flat and unpolished. The flow of the movie was uneven with flashbacks and asides dispersed throughout its two-hour run that messed up the main plot. Much so that I couldn’t identify the film’s rising action, climax, falling action, etc. I can’t say anything wrong with James, Nadine and everyone else in the cast because they did all they could with the source material that was given. Sadly, it wasn’t enough to make a satisfying movie experience.

Shout outs, Call outs and Watch outs:

  • Call out that loooooooooong flashback. It was basically half of the film. If you were going to use a flashback as a plot device, at least have the decency to tell your audience when the flashback ends. It was hard to tell how far in the future the first ten minutes was.
    • Although shout out to the foreign pop culture references in each year. You don’t often hear Jennifer Aniston and Brad Pitt’s breakup or the H1N1 scare in a Filipino movie. It could have been better if they also included local pop culture references. Like have Ava ask Coby to watch Diary Ng Panget (plus points for meta-humor)
  • Again shout out to the casting. Al Tantay’s always a lock to be the dad. And I was pleasantly surprised to see Candy Pangilinan in a nanay role. So much spunk and energy than the usual talents typecasted as the protagonist’s mother.
    • Shout out to Ronnie Lazaro who played Ate Bi, the gay owner of the cornerstore near Ava’s place. I know Ronnie Lazaro for his taong grasa roles and I haven’t seen him in such a role as this.
    • Shout out to Donnalyn Bartolome embodying the spunky bestfriend role. When will they give her a leading role?
  • Shout out to the musical director of the film. Who wouldn’t dance to Donna Cruz’s rendition of Langit Na Naman?
  • Watch out for that Skype call scene between Ava and Coby. Nadine is still the worst person to talk to on Skype
  • Biggest call out: using The Beard trope as the final issue to test their relationship. Seriously, it’s one of the easiest issues to clear up. The gay guy (in this case Bret Jackson’s character) just has to properly explain the situation. But based on the film’s logic, being a beard is a far worse issue than balancing priorities with love
  • Calling out also the decision to suddenly include Japan in the story. Of all places why Japan? It wasn’t clear why Ophelia (Nova Villa) went to Japan.
    • Also, why did they introduce the Ambassador Summer Lolo and Ophelia love story in the middle of the film all? And as if the Lolo and Ophelia had almost the same weight as the Coby and Ava story. Their happily ever after was tied closely to Lolo and Ophelia’s happily ever after.
  • Call out sa Cornetto. Yes we know na major sponsor kayo ng film

 

This Time is now showing in cinemas nationwide in the Philippines

Thoughts On…This Time

5 Things TV Networks Can Learn From OTWOL

 

On The Wings Of Love finally ended its fantastic seven-month run last week. As much as I want this show to have a season 2,  Clark and Leah deserve their peace after all they’ve been through. It was must-see local TV for me for its last two months. Thanks a lot Tonette Jadaone and Jojo Saguin, now there’s a gap in my heart that aches every 9:30 – 10:15pm (oo dahil laging naeextend).

Kidding aside, more than just being entertaining, the show experimented and did things that I do hope the TV network bigwigs will consider in producing the next batch of teleseryes. Here are a few things that I took note of:

1. THE FILIPINO AUDIENCE NOW HAS A DIVERSE PALATE

We’ve somehow touched on this in the most recent The Streamline Podcast episode; on how the treatment of our local romance films and TV shows had progressed from latin american telenovelas to more western and asian drama-infused. We can all praise the internet for that! Streaming or downloading your Breaking Bads and Baker Kings exposed Filipinos to other forms of storytelling and characterization that we haven’t seen yet in local TV. This made us generally more appreciative of entertainment.

It was nice that a teleserye like On The Wings Of Love was able to get the attention of Filipinos even though it didn’t involve rich guy-poor girl leads, villains (Simon’s an antagonist but not a villain), revenge plots or abandoned warehouses–the standard tropes you’d see in a local teleserye.

2. TIME TO BREAK OUR TRADITIONAL CHARACTER MOLDS

What if the man in the relationship’s the nurturing one while the woman was the driven one? What if we have gay characters that aren’t caricatures? Not only did On The Wings Of Love subverted our traditional notions of males, females and LGBTs  in media but it also fleshed them out. Yes, Clark and Leah were good-natured people, but they were also selfish and often insecure.

On episode 03 of All About OTWOL, I applauded how the writers approached the characters of Tita Jack and Mama Lou. Even though they were lesbian and gay, their sexuality wasn’t milked to play up the story. Tita Jack, even though she might be typified as a butch lesbian because of her looks, was as nurturing as any mom can be to Jigs and Clark. In the same vein, Mama Lou wasn’t typified as the loud parloristang bakla sa kanto, he was calm, composed and a voice of reason in tenement uno (the loudest resident award goes to Bebeng). [These characters reminded me of an episode of Netflix’s Master of None wherein Aziz Ansari’s character tried to fight his right to audition for an Indian character in a TV show without the stereotypical Indian accent.]

3. TRY OUT NEW WAYS OF STORYTELLING

Again, the Filipino audience of today’s more appreciative of creative ways of telling the story. Not every detail needs to be part of the dialogue or explicitly said or shown in-frame. Here are some of the things that they tried out:

  • Used spoken word poetry in key scenes to intensify the mood (Juan Miguel Severo’s piece in the finale was hella great)
  • Utilized teasers to mold expectations of the audience (damned San Fo teasers!)
  • Used animation as preface to a major turning point in the story (a classic Antoinette Jadaone technique 😉 )
  • Tatang Sol and Tita Jack conversations to help the audience process the motivations of Clark and Leah

4. GAWIN MONG LIGHT (AND UNEVEN)

Honestly, I have a hard time categorizing OTWOL, it wasn’t a pure comedy nor was it a pure drama. It did make good use of both. Throughout its run, it mixed up the comedic highs and dramatic lows to make a satisfying viewing experience. I can’t even call it a teleserye because the term is so heavily associated with a more serious tone. I guess I should just call it a good primetime TV show?

5. THE CONVERSATION IS ALMOST AS IMPORTANT AS THE PRODUCT

You know a show is great when you have an intense desire to discuss it with another person afterwards. Cable channel, AMC, capitalized on this insight and created companion talk shows that air after each episode of The Walking Dead and Breaking Bad (for season 5.2). It helped audiences process the things that happened considering how intense these shows can be.

OTWOL, may not have a companion talk show but it had #otwolistalk. OTWOL’s prod staff scoured the internet to feature reactions of viewers either either via video or via their website. Promoting content created by fans help in showing that the show values the support its fans are giving therefore encouraging fans to invest more on the TV show.

5 Things TV Networks Can Learn From OTWOL

All About OTWOL 05 Jadine In Love Concert and Finale Anticipation

The penultimate episode of the All About OTWOL Podcast by Pop Philtre

Nenz and Euge discuss last Saturday’s Jadine In Love concert, their hopes for OTWOL’s finale and listener questions and reactions.

Feel free to drop any comments, suggestions, or topics in our comment section below 🙂

Intro/Outro by Lee Rosevere

All About OTWOL 05 Jadine In Love Concert and Finale Anticipation